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Gallery: Water Jars

I have been making water drinking jars (like water bottles, but made from jars) for my family and friends.

I use acrylic paint on one piece of paper, and I use a pen to write notes to the water on another piece of paper. I put those papers together and cover them in clear tape. So far this ridiculous method of crafting has worked. I tape or hot glue the art to the jar.

Interestingly, nobody has called me crazy for making these jars. I think everyone should have one. I also enjoy making them… my level of enjoyment is way beyond what you might expect.

I write words to the water to bless the water and to recognize that it is sacred and that I love the water. Whoever is drinking from the jar is drinking water that is healing and full of love and positive intentions.

I like the give the jars away because I make each one customized for someone who understands how sacred water is, or someone who needs healing and positivity, or just someone I care about and want to give a gift to. Each jar has been different, and each person has inspired me in the art that I included on the jars. Without that inspiration I never would have made such beautiful jars.

I am posting these photos of my jars so that you can be inspired to make one of your own, make one as a gift for someone, or hopefully be made curious about water.

I am working on a longer blog post about water that I will post soon.

I will also be editing and updating this post to include descriptions of the jars, as well as a list of what is written on each jar.

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Jar #1

This was the first water jar I made. I made it for myself, but I recently gave it to my cousin. She had made a water jar of her own, but she gave that one away, and then I gave this one to her. I like to think that giving a water jar as a gift is even better than making one for yourself, because when you give one away you are intending many wonderful things for the person you give it to. You wish health and love and kindness and you show them that you believe that they are deserving of all of this and more.

The book that I included in the picture is the book that gave me the idea for the water jars. If you have not heard of the author or the book, please find out as much as you can. Most of the content of the book is actually online, on Dr. Emoto’s website, as well as on Youtube. There are multiple documentaries about Dr. Emoto’s work, and about others who have continued his work and developed it further. One of my favourite documentaries of all time is called “Water the Great Mystery,” and it is also based on Dr. Emoto’s work.

 

What I wrote to the water:

“Aditya Hridayam Punyam Sarva Shatru Bina Shanam.

Aditya Hridayam Punyam Sarva Shatru Bina Shanam.

Aditya Hridayam Punyam Sarva Shatru Bina Shanam.

Love Gratitude Love Gratitude

Love Gratitude Love Gratitude

Love Gratitude Love Gratitude.

Aloha Mahalo Aloha Mahalo

Aloha Mahalo Aloha Mahalo

Aloha Mahalo Aloha Mahalo.”

 

Why I chose these words:

Aditya Hridayam Punyam Sarva Shatru Bina Shanam: “When the sun is kept in the heart, all evil vanishes from life.” This is a Sanskrit phrase; the special formulation of the flow of syllables is meant to activate each chakra. I discovered this phrase in a book by Ram Dass, called “Journey of Awakening.” I wrote about this book in my older post, “Sol,” and I have also written about this phrase and what it means to me. This is my mantra for meditation and for life in general.

Love Gratitude: “Love & Gratitude” are Dr. Emoto’s words of choice to bless water. He states in his book that these words help form the most beautiful water crystals. Dr. Emoto wants us to learn a very important and profound lesson from his experiences with water molecules and crystals. He wants us to learn how essential love and gratitude are. He also wants us to learn a lesson that I myself am still working towards: water crystals allow us to see that there is not always, and not often, a grey area between black and white. Usually, there is a clear line, of what is right and what is not. Being able to view the differences that positive or negative words and phrases can make on water crystals, not to mention the other developments that this work has led to, shows us that words have more influence than we ever thought. It shows us that we have more power than we ever thought; the power to heal or to harm, with our intentions.

Aloha Mahalo: “Aloha” is a Hawaiian greeting. It is one of the words that is most sacred to me. I plan on moving to Hawaii, and learning more of their incredible language. The words Aloha and Mahalo have so much love and positive intention and blessings in them that they are almost ineffable. The words do not convey the meaning, they merely intend to represent the gift of love and unity with all that is, and the emotional experience of this knowledge. There are many meanings to these words, and so I will share a few quotes and links for more information.

 

Aloha: huna.org/html/deeper

“THE DEEPER MEANING OF ALOHA
by Curby Rule

For those who follow the path of Huna, or are fortunate enough to live in Hawai’i, it is common for us to use the word Aloha. We use it in greetings and farewells and in expressing love. But the word means even more, it is a way of life.

Besides these common meanings, the word Aloha holds within itself all one needs to know to interact rightfully in the natural world. These insights describe an attitude or way of life sometimes called “The Aloha Spirit” or “The Way of Aloha”.

The spirit of Aloha was an important lesson taught to the children of the past because it was about the world of which they were a part. One early teaching goes like this:

Aloha is being a part of all, and all being a part of me. When there is pain – it is my pain. When there is joy – it is also mine. I respect all that is as part of the Creator and part of me. I will not willfully harm anyone or anything. When food is needed I will take only my need and explain why it is being taken. The earth, the sky, the sea are mine to care for, to cherish and to protect. This is Hawaiian – this is Aloha!
As the child grew, the need for a fundamental code of ethics was taught. This code is found within a deeper layer of the meaning of the word Aloha. The code is derived from one of the acronymic meanings of Aloha.
A, ala, watchful, alertness
L, lokahi, working with unity
O, oia’i’o, truthful honesty
H, ha’aha’a, humility
A, ahonui, patient perseverance
The kahuna David Bray interprets this code as “Come forward, be in unity and harmony with your real self, God, and mankind. Be honest, truthful, patient, kind to all life forms, and humble.” He also stated that to the Hawaiian of old, Aloha meant “God in us.”

So far, within Aloha, we have found an explanation of our place in the world and a code of ethics to help us with our interactions in the world. The only thing we are missing is our “prime directive” while we are here, and that too can be found within the root words that make up Aloha.

alo, 1. sharing 2. in the present
oha, joyous affection, joy
ha, life energy, life, breath
Using Hawaiian language grammatical rules, we will translate this literally as “The joyful sharing of life energy in the present” or simply “Joyfully sharing life”.

But another layer of meaning can be found by factoring in the meanings of the roots words in aloha. “A” means “to burn” (figuratively, to sparkle) and it is also the name of mold found in souring foods. “Lo” is short for lo’o and loa’a which mean “to obtain or procure”. Together these indicate a transformation of energy (burning, sparkling, souring food), a product of an energy transformation (the mold), and an effort to get or obtain something. To me this sounds exactly like consciously manifesting or creating. This brings us to another translation of Aloha. “To consciously manifest life joyously in the present.” This is our prime directive.

Another translation of Aloha gives us the a prime method of acquiring the Mana or spiritual influence, to use in manifesting. Breathing in the present moment. Awareness of your breath and correct normal breathing increases Mana and concentrated breathing increases mana even more.

I have always had a Big Cosmic Question about our existence, which is much easier to contemplate when broken down into smaller parts. The parts are Who, What, When, Where, and Why. Aloha has answered three of these, so far. Who, of course is you and I. What, is the conscious creation of your Reality. When, is Now, the Present Moment, that place between past and future, which is the only place Reality exists. The answer to Where, is Nature. The answer to Why, is because we are here to cherish, protect and take care of this being we live upon, the Earth.

I will explain.

The Hawaiians have no word for “nature” as in the sense of “being outside in nature”, but they do have a word for “world” or “Earth”. The word is honua and it also means “background” or “foundation”. The ancient Hawaiians did not view nature as being something separate from themselves because nature was their reality. So, Where is in Nature, the foundation of our physical world.

To find the answer to Why, we must look deeper.

If we look at the root words in honua we find the word ho’o-nu a. Some of the meanings of this word are: 1. to give generously and continuously; 2. to indulge as a child; and 3. surging, rising in swells, as the sea. So, a deeper meaning of honua is that the foundation of our physical reality, Nature, is continuously and generously giving to satisfy our needs and fulfill our wishes. But here is also a meaning of give and take. Just as the rising swells of the sea recede to gain renewed energy, Nature must also “recede” to renew Itself and give strength to the foundation of our reality. So, just as Nature gives of itself to us, we must give of ourselves back to Nature.

This truth can be found in one the tellings of the creation story about Papa and Wakea, the prime Earth Mother and Sky Father.

“From the first union of Papa and Wakea, comes a male child who is born prematurely. The child is dead at birth and is buried. From his body grows a shoot that Wakea names Haloa. This shoot becomes the first taro plant. The next male child to be born is also named Haloa in honor of his dead sibling and he becomes the prime ancestor of mankind”.

Let me explain the meanings behind this story.

Haloa means “long, waving stem”. This first taro plant represents a staple of the Polynesian diet, but also all plants that grow on this earth. Haloa, also means “long breath” and on an esoteric level, “everlasting cycle.” The life and death cycle of plants sustain all creatures, including us. Plants are a source of food and medicine, and they produce the oxygen we breathe. The first human is named Haloa in honor of these plants and to remind us to honor and tend the “everlasting cycle.” The gift of life passes from a human to the plants and then back to humanity.

This story tells us that the quality of our existence is ultimately tied to Nature. Nature’s continuous transformative cycles of water, air and growth are necessary for existence. Nature is an embodiment of the meaning of Aloha, and vice versa. It is no coincidence that Aloha and Haloa are re-spellings of each other. It is in Nature that we can discover the wonder of our existence here on Earth. Where else but in Nature is the spirit of Aloha easier to experience? Its beauty is awe-inspiring and energizing and draws you into the present moment, not unlike the feelings brought on by love and joy.

Nature is also where we can gain the wisdom to make responsible choices if we approach with Aloha in our heart. With an attitude of Aloha we can gain from the wisdom of the wind and the wisdom of the water and the wisdom of the soil and the wisdom of the trees and learn from the truths and revelations presented by the non-human community.

So, we’ve seen that Aloha is indeed a way of life, an attitude and it even contains guidelines to help us in our lives. It is most definitely a “word to the wise.”

In closing, I’d like to bring to mind another old saying, “a picture is worth a thousand words” and point out that Aloha is a perfect example that in the Hawaiian language sometimes the opposite of this saying is true as well. So, the next time you greet a friend with “Aloha,” hold its meanings close to your heart and think of the picture you’re painting. It is indeed a beautiful world.

 

Aloha and Mahalo: oocities.org/…olelo/shelties/mahalo-aloha

Aloha & Mahalo
[Pronounced: ah loh’ hah & mah hah’ loh]

If you learn just two words in Hawaiian, learn these. They are two of the most important words in the Hawaiian language, representing paramount Hawaiian values.

In Hawaiian thinking, words have mana [pronounced: mah’ nah], meaning spiritual or divine power], and aloha and mahalo are among the most sacred and powerful.

Say them often as they can be life-transforming and -enhancing. Be careful to use them ONLY if you truly feel mahalo or aloha within. Do not exploit these words for personal gain, and neither cheapen, nor trivialize their use by verbalizing them carelessly or without sincerity.

Aloha and mahalo are ineffable, indescribable, and undefinable with words alone; to be understood, they must be experienced.

Deeper meaning and sacredness is hinted at by the root words of these words. Linguists differ in their opinions as to the exact meanings and origins, but this is what was told to me by my kupuna (elder):

On a spiritual level, aloha is an invocation of the Divine and mahalo is a Divine blessing. Both are acknowledgments of the Divinity that dwells within and without.

Aloha
[Alo = presence, front, face] + [hâ = breath]
“The presence of (Divine) Breath.”

Mahalo
[Ma = In] + [hâ = breath] + [alo = presence, front, face]
“(May you be) in (Divine) Breath.”

Think of them as single-word blessings or prayers.

The following are dictionary definitions using English words, which are approximate translations, at best:*
Aloha. 1. Aloha, love, affection, compassion, mercy, sympathy, pity, kindness, sentiment, grace, charity; greeting, salutation, regards; sweetheart, lover, lover, loved one; beloved, loving, kind, compassionate, charitable, lovable; to love, be fond of; to show kindness, mercy, pity, charity, affection; to venerate; to remember with affection; to greet, to hail. Greetings! Hello! Good-by! Farewell! Alas!

Aloha `oe!
[ah loh’ hah oe!]
May you be loved or greeted!
Farewell or greetings to one person.

Aloha kâua!
[ah loh’ hah KAH’oo (w)ah!]
May there be friendship or love between us!
Greetings to you and me!

Aloha kâkou!
[ah loh’ hah KAH’ kou!]
same as above, but to more than one person.

Ke aloha nô!
[ah loh hah NOH’]
Aloha indeed!

Aloha!
[ Ah loh’ hah!]
Greetings!

Mahalo. 1. Thanks, gratitude; to thank.

Mahalo nui loa.
[mah hah’ loh noo'(w)ee loh'(w)ah]
Thanks very much.

`Ôlelo mahalo
[OH’ leh loh mah hah’ loh]
compliment

Mahalo â nui
[mah hah’ loh (W)AH’ noo'(w)ee]
Thanks very much.
2. Admiration, praise, esteem, regards, respects; to admire, praise, appreciate.

`O wau nô me ka mahalo,
[oh vau NOH’ meh kah mah hah’loh]
I am, [yours] respectfully,

Ka mea i mahalo `ia, Laki
[kah meh'(y)ah ee mah hah’loh ee'(y)ah, lah’ kee]
The esteemed Laki.”

*Source: Pukui, Mary Kawena & Elbert, Samuel H., HAWAIIAN DICTIONARY, University of Hawai`i Press, Honolulu, 1986.

One of the most frequently requested translations is:

Aloha au iâ `oe.
[ah loh’ hah vau’ ee (Y)AH’ oe]
I love you.

Ke aloha nô me ka mahalo kâua!
Aloha indeed with mahalo to you and me!”

 

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Jar #2

I made this jar for a friend. We met by happy-accident at the restaurant/”speak-easy”/coffee shop where he works. One night I was on my way home from a church that I had randomly attended, and it was around 10pm. I had to catch a bus, so I ran all the way down the street and as I got close to the stop I saw the bus drive past.

I had to use the restroom but I had doubted that I would find one so late on a Sunday. I turned around and noticed that I was standing in front of a restaurant and sure enough, their “Open” sign was still shining in the window. I looked up at the sign and saw the word “Tiger” and I knew I had to go inside, if only to use the restroom. That same night, at the church I had randomly attended for the first time, I had been told that a tiger was in my life, protecting me. Whether or not this is or was true, I took it as a sign. I went inside and the bartender greeted me, and I told him I had missed my bus.

We ended up talking for quite a while, about the most wonderful topics. It turns out that we both went to the same University, at the same time, and we were in the same program (Bio-Psychology). I stayed and talked until his boss arrived… As soon as his boss walked in the door I recognized him as the first person/student-housing-tenant/tour-guide that I met when I moved into student housing at the age of 17. He is now part-owner of my favourite speak-easy, and the boss of one of my favourite people.

The bartender and I became good friends, and disregarding the fact that I had not had alcohol in two years, I actually did order a drink that night and it was the best drink I have ever had. I consciously stopped drinking alcohol two years ago because my body has trouble digesting alcohol, but also because I have seen the damage that alcohol has done to people and to families and to society in general and I decided that I did not need that in my life. I guess that night I was feeling more adventurous than usual.

I decided to make a jar for this beautiful soul because of our beautiful conversations. I feel like he understands how sacred water is, and the purpose behind the jar. He understands the importance of love and of gratitude. He recently got back from a trip to Asia. One of the places he visited was Japan, and I decided to use Japanese characters as a theme for this jar. The Japanese characters can have multiple meanings, symbolizing many things at once. The Japanese symbols are described below.

 

What I wrote to the water:

“Inochi – Life, the most important things.

Mei – Order, instruction, and destiny.

Where there is Love, there is Life.”

 

Why I chose these words:

I chose Japanese characters because my friend had just returned from a trip to Asia, and he had stopped in Japan. The Japanese characters can have multiple meanings. I spent a great deal of time painting the characters, and I wrote their meanings on the inside. The first character is both Inochi, and Mei. Inochi and Mei are represented by the same symbol. Inochi means both, “Life,” and “The most important things.” Mei means, “Order,” “Instruction,” and “Destiny.” The second symbol is Ai. Ai is the Japanese symbol for love. The symbol represents many different forms of love and many different words describing love. I looked up the meaning of the characters on the following websites…

I liked the combination of the symbols for life and for love. I combined these symbols on the outer part of the jar, and I wrote their meanings on the inside. I then decided to attach a metal decoration to the jar, which had the following quote from Mahatma Gandhi engraved on it, “Where there is love, there is life.” I attached the metal piece and then I ended up writing the quote under the meanings of the Japanese symbols. The quote brings the two symbols and their meanings together.


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Jar #3

I made this jar for a friend. I ended up keeping it as my personal water jar. I chose the Yin-Yang symbol because I believe that life is all about trying to find a balance. Accepting the bad experiences as part of life; the part that allows you to appreciate the good experiences. It is essential for every person to recognize that we, as a species, are not fundamentally good nor bad. We are meant to make moral decisions, and to learn from the good and the bad experiences. I also am profoundly moved by the patterns of night and day, the cycle of the sun and the cycle of water that it creates and sustains. I love that the Yin-Yang symbol shows the dark and light together, as a unity, while there is a clear division between them.

I was particularly inspired by the following image…

download.jpg

What I wrote to the water:

“Aditya Hridayam Punyam Sarva Shatru Bina Shanam.

When the sun is kept in the heart, all evil vanishes from life.

Where there is love there is life.

Where there is love, there is no question.

Aloha. Mahalo. Aloha. Mahalo. Aloha. Mahalo.

Love & Gratitude. Love & Gratitude. Love & Gratitude.

Every day is a new chance to make the world a better place.

Inochi. Mei. Ai. Inochi. Mei. Ai.”

 

Why I chose these words:

Some of these words are the same as on the first and second jars. I will copy and paste my explanation of that jar, here, for ease of reading.

“Aditya Hridayam Punyam Sarva Shatru Bina Shanam: “When the sun is kept in the heart, all evil vanishes from life.” This is a Sanskrit phrase; the special formulation of the flow of syllables is meant to activate each chakra. I discovered this phrase in a book by Ram Dass, called “Journey of Awakening.” I wrote about this book in my older post, “Sol,” and I have also written about this phrase and what it means to me. This is my mantra for meditation and for life in general.

Love Gratitude: “Love & Gratitude” are Dr. Emoto’s words of choice to bless water. He states in his book that these words help form the most beautiful water crystals. Dr. Emoto wants us to learn a very important and profound lesson from his experiences with water molecules and crystals. He wants us to learn how essential love and gratitude are. He also wants us to learn a lesson that I myself am still working towards: water crystals allow us to see that there is not always, and not often, a grey area between black and white. Usually, there is a clear line, of what is right and what is not. Being able to view the differences that positive or negative words and phrases can make on water crystals, not to mention the other developments that this work has led to, shows us that words have more influence than we ever thought. It shows us that we have more power than we ever thought; the power to heal or to harm, with our intentions.

Aloha Mahalo: “Aloha” is a Hawaiian greeting. It is one of the words that is most sacred to me. I plan on moving to Hawaii, and learning more of their incredible language. The words Aloha and Mahalo have so much love and positive intention and blessings in them that they are almost ineffable. The words do not convey the meaning, they merely intend to represent the gift of love and unity with all that is, and the emotional experience of this knowledge. There are many meanings to these words, and so I will share a few quotes and links for more information.”

Inochi, Mei, Ai: “I chose Japanese characters because my friend had just returned from a trip to Asia, and he had stopped in Japan. The Japanese characters can have multiple meanings. I spent a great deal of time painting the characters, and I wrote their meanings on the inside. The first character is both Inochi, and Mei. Inochi and Mei are represented by the same symbol. Inochi means both, “Life,” and “The most important things.” Mei means, “Order,” “Instruction,” and “Destiny.” The second symbol is Ai. Ai is the Japanese symbol for love. The symbol represents many different forms of love and many different words describing love. I looked up the meaning of the characters on the following websites…

I liked the combination of the symbols for life and for love. I combined these symbols on the outer part of the jar, and I wrote their meanings on the inside. I then decided to attach a metal decoration to the jar, which had the following quote from Mahatma Gandhi engraved on it, “Where there is love, there is life.” I attached the metal piece and then I ended up writing the quote under the meanings of the Japanese symbols. The quote brings the two symbols and their meanings together.”

Where there is love, there is no question: This quote is one of my favourites. I do not know who said it originally, but it sums up everything I have ever experienced. I used to say, “love is always the answer,” but now I know that there is no room for questions or doubts where pure loving intention is involved.

Every day is a new chance to make the world a better place: This quote is one of my own. It is a daily reminder to myself that I have power. I have influence. I have life. I have love in my heart. I have another chance to be the person I want most to be. I have another chance to help someone. I have another chance to improve my life and the lives of others. I have another chance to chase my dreams. I have another chance to make the world a better place. Every time the sun rises.

 

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Jar#4

I made this jar for my mother. My mum is a lovely lady. She has a heart of gold, and she has overcome more stress and hardship than I can imagine. She is one of the reasons I have not given up on the world and on humanity. I made this jar as a gift for her birthday. I wanted to give her something really special, and something that I made myself. For my birthday last year she gave me a painting of her own. Even though my mum does not believe everything Masaru Emoto has to say, I decided that she should have a water jar and I should be the one to make it. I wanted to paint something that would hold a lot of meaning to my mum. I wanted to fill this jar, inside and out, with my love and my light, and all of my hope and healing intentions.

I painted a dragonfly because that is my mother’s spirit animal… Either a dragonfly, or a hybrid of a dragonfly and a squirrel… Possibly a flying squirrel… It has yet to be determined. As long as I can remember, my mum has had a connection to dragonflies, and I have always remembered the time that one landed on her head as my very first memory.

You will also notice that I painted the gift tag that says “With Love.” The tags are black and white, and then you paint them if you want to. It did not take as much effort as it looks, but it did take a lot of time to get the colours how I wanted. The flowers were inspired by my cousin. I gave her fake flowers when she was in the hospital, and when she got home she painted them. I decided I really wanted painted flowers of my own, so I bought white roses and painted them. I have given most of them away. I love the way the paint looks and I plan on making more and maybe even selling them along with vases. I would never sell my water jars, they are meant to be given away, but I might sell the flowers and give away the jars as a gift with purchase. I have no immediate plans to get started on selling anything, but if someone out there is interested and wants me to design or create a water jar for them, I would love to do so.

I attached a cross to the jar because my mother is religious and spiritual. She is a pastor, and has been since I was a young child. I attached a dragonfly to the jar because she loves dragonflies, and when I saw this particular decoration I knew right away that I would use it to make something beautiful for her. I attached the words “Love Always” under the cross to remind her that I will always love her, and to remind her that real love is not temporary.

I painted the Om symbol because I have a profound connection to this symbol myself. Om is the sound of the universe. It is the sound of the sun. It is the word used in meditation to bring you to a higher dimension, or a higher consciousness. It is the word used to bring us all closer to unity, and through unity, harmony. This word/sound/symbol is deeply rooted in the vibration/frequencies which Masaru Emoto has studied through water crystals. I will share an analysis of the Om symbol, and then continue my explanation below…

meaningofom

What I wrote to the water:

“Where there is love, there is life.

Where there is love, there is no question.

Let Love Rule.

Love is all you need.

When the sun is kept in the heart, all evil vanishes from life.

Om.

Aloha.

Mahalo.

Gratitude.

Love.”

 

Why I chose these words:

Some of these words are the same as on the other jars. I will copy and paste my explanation of those jars, here, for ease of reading.

Aditya Hridayam Punyam Sarva Shatru Bina Shanam: “When the sun is kept in the heart, all evil vanishes from life.” This is a Sanskrit phrase; the special formulation of the flow of syllables is meant to activate each chakra. I discovered this phrase in a book by Ram Dass, called “Journey of Awakening.” I wrote about this book in my older post, “Sol,” and I have also written about this phrase and what it means to me. This is my mantra for meditation and for life in general.

Love, Gratitude: “Love & Gratitude” are Dr. Emoto’s words of choice to bless water. He states in his book that these words help form the most beautiful water crystals. Dr. Emoto wants us to learn a very important and profound lesson from his experiences with water molecules and crystals. He wants us to learn how essential love and gratitude are. He also wants us to learn a lesson that I myself am still working towards: water crystals allow us to see that there is not always, and not often, a grey area between black and white. Usually, there is a clear line, of what is right and what is not. Being able to view the differences that positive or negative words and phrases can make on water crystals, not to mention the other developments that this work has led to, shows us that words have more influence than we ever thought. It shows us that we have more power than we ever thought; the power to heal or to harm, with our intentions.

Aloha, Mahalo: “Aloha” is a Hawaiian greeting. It is one of the words that is most sacred to me. I plan on moving to Hawaii, and learning more of their incredible language. The words Aloha and Mahalo have so much love and positive intention and blessings in them that they are almost ineffable. The words do not convey the meaning, they merely intend to represent the gift of love and unity with all that is, and the emotional experience of this knowledge. There are many meanings to these words, and so I will share a few quotes and links for more information. (See above for links)

Where there is love, there is life:  “I chose Japanese characters because my friend had just returned from a trip to Asia, and he had stopped in Japan. The Japanese characters can have multiple meanings. I spent a great deal of time painting the characters, and I wrote their meanings on the inside. The first character is both Inochi, and Mei. Inochi and Mei are represented by the same symbol. Inochi means both, “Life,” and “The most important things.” Mei means, “Order,” “Instruction,” and “Destiny.” The second symbol is Ai. Ai is the Japanese symbol for love. The symbol represents many different forms of love and many different words describing love. I looked up the meaning of the characters on the following websites… (See above for links).

I like the combination of the symbols for life and for love. I combined these symbols on the outer part of the jar, and I wrote their meanings on the inside. I then decided to attach a metal decoration to the jar, which had the following quote from Mahatma Gandhi engraved on it, “Where there is love, there is life.” I attached the metal piece and then I ended up writing the quote under the meanings of the Japanese symbols. The quote brings the two symbols and their meanings together.

Where there is love, there is no question: This quote is one of my favourites. I do not know who said it originally, but it sums up everything I have ever experienced. I used to say, “love is always the answer,” but now I know that there is no room for questions or doubts where pure loving intention is involved.

Let Love Rule: This is my mother’s favourite quote/phrase/mantra. The only phrase I have heard her use more, is “Do the next thing.” In the process of becoming my mother’s daughter I have adopted her favourite quote as one of my own. My mantra might sound different, but it is the same in essence.

Love is all you need: This is another one of my favourite quotes. You will notice that I wrote “love” multiple times on each jar. That was not by coincidence. That is one of the most important parts of each jar. Without love, we never would have existed in the first place. Without love, none of us can survive. You can choose to live without love in your heart, but you cannot live completely without love or the effect of love.

Om: Please see the picture and explanation above.

20161002_010925.jpg

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Jar #5

I made this jar for my auntie. My auntie is one of the people most important in my life right now. She became my godmother earlier this year, on her birthday. I gave this to her as a gift when she came to visit me, after her birthday had passed. She lives far away but she comes to my city every once in a while. I have met her about three or four times so far. Every time I meet her I get to know more about her, and I feel like we are connected more and more. My dad was adopted as a child, and up until a few years ago I only met a few members of his biological family. The auntie who is also my godmother, is part of my dad’s biological family, and so mine too. I had never thought that my family, either biological or adoptive, would be able to accept me as I am. I never believed that I could be entirely authentic in front of them, and still be loved and accepted by them. When I am with my auntie, I know that is not so. I know that she loves me as I am, and I love her as she is. She has helped me explore parts of myself, my family, and my culture that I never had access too before.

I painted a very similar picture as that which I mentioned above, on jar #3. It is a picture I found on Pinterest, which inspired me to paint jar #3, and then again for jar #5. This jar I decided to paint even more similar to the original picture. I used many of the same colours and methods as for jar #3. I will copy and paste my explanation of the use of the Yin-Yang symbol, for ease of reading…

“I chose the Yin-Yang symbol because I believe that life is all about trying to find a balance. Accepting the bad experiences as part of life; the part that allows you to appreciate the good experiences. It is essential for every person to recognize that we, as a species, are not fundamentally good nor bad. We are meant to make moral decisions, and to learn from the good and the bad experiences. I also am profoundly moved by the patterns of night and day, the cycle of the sun and the cycle of water that it creates and sustains. I love that the Yin-Yang symbol shows the dark and light together, as a unity, while there is a clear division between them.”

I also love that the sun and water is represented in this particular image. I am a whole-hearted supporter of solar power. I also hope to one day have a non-profit organization devoted to giving clean water to all who need it (everyone)!

I did not paint the flowers that I gave to my auntie. I mentioned above that I painted the flowers for jar #4, and that I love painted flowers. I did not have time to paint these ones before giving them to my auntie. When I did give her the jar and the flowers she told me that she absolutely loves white roses, and that they are her favourite. She would not let me take the flowers to paint them. It worked out perfectly after all. She also told me that she absolutely loves Swarovsky (sp?) crystals. I used two of them as decorations for her jar. I originally bought these charms to make a necklace to match a set of earrings that I have had for years. When I was decorating this jar I wanted to make it the most beautiful of all, so I used some of these heart shaped crystals. Interestingly enough, my auntie gave me earrings after I gave her this jar, and they are truly the most beautiful earrings.

 

What I wrote to the water:

“Aditya Hridayam Punyam Sarva Shatru Bina Shanam.

When the sun is kept in the heart, all evil vanishes from life.

Where there is love, there is life. – Mahatma Gandhi

Where there is love, there is no question.

Aloha. Mahalo. Aloha. Mahalo. Aloha. Mahalo.

Love & Gratitude. Love & Gratitude. Love & Gratitude.

Every day is a new chance to make the world a better place.”

 

Why I chose these words:

Some of these words are the same as on the other jars. I will copy and paste my explanation of those jars, here, for ease of reading.

Aditya Hridayam Punyam Sarva Shatru Bina Shanam: “When the sun is kept in the heart, all evil vanishes from life.” This is a Sanskrit phrase; the special formulation of the flow of syllables is meant to activate each chakra. I discovered this phrase in a book by Ram Dass, called “Journey of Awakening.” I wrote about this book in my older post, “Sol,” and I have also written about this phrase and what it means to me. This is my mantra for meditation and for life in general.

Love, Gratitude: “Love & Gratitude” are Dr. Emoto’s words of choice to bless water. He states in his book that these words help form the most beautiful water crystals. Dr. Emoto wants us to learn a very important and profound lesson from his experiences with water molecules and crystals. He wants us to learn how essential love and gratitude are. He also wants us to learn a lesson that I myself am still working towards: water crystals allow us to see that there is not always, and not often, a grey area between black and white. Usually, there is a clear line, of what is right and what is not. Being able to view the differences that positive or negative words and phrases can make on water crystals, not to mention the other developments that this work has led to, shows us that words have more influence than we ever thought. It shows us that we have more power than we ever thought; the power to heal or to harm, with our intentions.

Aloha, Mahalo: “Aloha” is a Hawaiian greeting. It is one of the words that is most sacred to me. I plan on moving to Hawaii, and learning more of their incredible language. The words Aloha and Mahalo have so much love and positive intention and blessings in them that they are almost ineffable. The words do not convey the meaning, they merely intend to represent the gift of love and unity with all that is, and the emotional experience of this knowledge. There are many meanings to these words, and so I will share a few quotes and links for more information. (See above for links)

Where there is love, there is life:  “I chose Japanese characters because my friend had just returned from a trip to Asia, and he had stopped in Japan. The Japanese characters can have multiple meanings. I spent a great deal of time painting the characters, and I wrote their meanings on the inside. The first character is both Inochi, and Mei. Inochi and Mei are represented by the same symbol. Inochi means both, “Life,” and “The most important things.” Mei means, “Order,” “Instruction,” and “Destiny.” The second symbol is Ai. Ai is the Japanese symbol for love. The symbol represents many different forms of love and many different words describing love. I looked up the meaning of the characters on the following websites… (See above for links).

I like the combination of the symbols for life and for love. I combined these symbols on the outer part of the jar, and I wrote their meanings on the inside. I then decided to attach a metal decoration to the jar, which had the following quote from Mahatma Gandhi engraved on it, “Where there is love, there is life.” I attached the metal piece and then I ended up writing the quote under the meanings of the Japanese symbols. The quote brings the two symbols and their meanings together.

Where there is love, there is no question: This quote is one of my favourites. I do not know who said it originally, but it sums up everything I have ever experienced. I used to say, “love is always the answer,” but now I know that there is no room for questions or doubts where pure loving intention is involved.

Every day is a new chance to make the world a better place: This quote is one of my own. It is a daily reminder to myself that I have power. I have influence. I have life. I have love in my heart. I have another chance to be the person I want most to be. I have another chance to help someone. I have another chance to improve my life and the lives of others. I have another chance to chase my dreams. I have another chance to make the world a better place. Every time the sun rises.

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Jar #6

I made this jar for an aboriginal elder. She is one of the most wonderful people I have ever met. She shines brighter than a star; beams of love and compassion. She makes you feel like you are wrapped in a warm hug, even when you are facing something as dark and intimidating and scary as the Truth. She heard the truth the day that I met her, and I got to hear it too. It was hard to hear, but it was necessary. When I met her I knew that I loved her, just the way she is, without even knowing her. She volunteers every week to counsel those who are facing one of the worst things that can happen in one’s life.

I decided I needed to make a water jar for her, regardless of the fact that we never spoke about water. I wanted to make a jar, but I had an idea that I would make it out of copper. Copper is sacred in indigenous culture. They use it in ceremonies, especially water ceremonies. I wanted to make a water jar that could be used in ceremonies, and would be considered sacred, even by an elder. There was only one problem: if I used copper, how would I write a message to the water? The glass of jars allows me to write the message easily. I had no idea what to do about this, and I did not think much more about it.

I did think about what I would put on the jar. During the meeting with this angel, she showed us her husband’s business card. On this card was a basic depiction of the medicine wheel. Up until that moment I had never considered this, or wondered what it meant. As soon as I got home I googled it, and I asked my aboriginal friend to tell me about it. I wanted to use the medicine wheel as the theme for the jar, but I got profoundly inspired by a picture I saw of the medicine wheel. My friend told me it can be depicted in many ways, and that I should try to paint it the way that seems most meaningful to myself (or to the recipient of the jar).

After I left the meeting, my cousin and I went to a local thrift shop. We looked at all sorts of things, mostly knick-knacks and Halloween costumes. I looked at coffee mugs because my cousin was toting around an old mug that was missing its lid. I decided to buy one with a lid, for my cousin. As I was looking through all the coffee mugs, I saw something copper. I picked it up and was beyond surprised. Beyond the level of surprised I ever thought possible. I had to laugh. This copper mug had a glass bottom. It was the only one there, although it was beside a collection of three very similar brass mugs.

I wanted the copper one, and I only had $4 to my name. Sadly, there was no price tag on it. So I crossed my fingers and went to the counter to inquire. The three brass mugs were only $2.99 for the set. The one copper mug was determined to be $2.99 on its own. I spent my last $4 on that copper mug, and the coffee mug for my cousin. I knew as soon as I saw that mug that it was brought to me by fate, by pure loving intention, and by miracle. It could not have been more perfect, especially for my purposes. I ended up having to hot glue the bottom of the mug to keep it from leaking, but that was a minor problem. I was truly blessed to find this beautiful treasure, just when I was wishing for it, and just when I was losing hope that it existed.

 

What I wrote to the water:

Why I chose these words:

 

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Jar #7

I made this jar for one of my newest friends. He is an incredible musician, and an incredibly beautiful human – inside and out. In my life, it has been so rare to meet people as kind and knowing as he is, and even more rare to meet someone who understands so much of the many odd topics constantly on my mind.

I met him as I met my other friend, by happy-accident. I was on my way to my cousin’s place. I go there every week to help her out and see if there is anything she needs, or just to annoy her and make her go to see live music with me (or other assorted adventures; you name it). I always pass by my ex’s house on my way there. He lives so close to my cousin. I usually see him at the bus stop, or on the bus, or walking around, or randomly whenever I am in that area. It makes me sad to see him, because I do still miss him, and I love him. I wish we were still friends, or that we had never been anything more than friends (would it be easier that way? Would he still be a part of my life? I will never know). I usually walk past his house as quick as I can.

On this particular day, I saw a sign for the homeopathic clinic that is beside his house. I always see the sign on the way to my cousin’s, and I always wanted to go inside and inquire about their services. I never had a direct purpose to go inside, and I always tried to pass by quickly because of my ex’s house. That day, I was looking to buy saffron. I had no idea where to find it, but I decided to go in to the homeopathic clinic and ask them. Maybe they sold it, or maybe they would know where to find it. I was not even sure I could afford to buy any, but I decided to stop and try.

I went in, and there was nobody at the front desk. I read some of the posters that they had on the wall, about the founding of the clinic, and about their services. A man walked in to the room, and I thought he was just a patient at the clinic. He greeted me and smiled and I realized he was probably one of the staff. I asked him about the saffron, but he told me that they do not sell it there, and he did not know much about saffron. I ended up ranting to him about saffron, and water, and solar power, and all sorts of things. It was a beautiful conversation with a beautiful soul, and I can only pray that there will be more conversations like that in my life time.

We got to know each other a little bit, and then I wrote down a bunch of websites and documentaries about water, in addition to my own blog, and gave it to him. Before I left I told him about the live music that I would be going to that evening with my cousin, and I invited him to come along after work. He told me he knows the musician I was going to see (I go to hear her play every week), and that he is a musician himself. I checked out one of his songs on Youtube that same night, and while I was listening I was inspired to write a short piece of writing. I posted this piece of writing on my blog, it is called “Without the Rain.” I also included a link to my friend’s song, which inspired this piece of writing.

After the conversation with this new friend, I knew that I wanted to make a water jar for him. Before I left the clinic, I asked if he wanted to drink from my water jar (yeah, okay, it is kind of an odd thing to ask). He kind of laughed and said he was okay. He showed me that while I was writing things down, he had taken a sticky note and written “Love & Gratitude” on it, and had placed it on his glass water jug. I was very impressed, to say the least. I told many people what I learned about water, but he was the first person to take it seriously, enough to even bless his own water right after I told him… It made me beyond happy to see that someone not only understood what I was talking about, but actually felt as strongly as I did about it.

 

What I wrote to the water:

“Lord, make me an instrument of thy peace.
Where there is hatred, let me sow love;
Where there is injury, pardon;
Where there is doubt, faith;
Where there is despair, hope;
Where there is darkness, light;
Where there is sadness, joy.

Love & Gratitude

Namaste (with symbol)

I honour the place in you in which the entire universe dwells.

I honour the place in you which is of love, light, peace, and joy.

When you are in that place in you, and I am in that place in me,

We Are One.

Where there is love, there is life.

WATER IS LIFE.

Come forward, be in unity and harmony with your real self, God, and mankind. Be honest, truthful, patient, kind and humble to all life forms.”\

 

Why I chose these words:

 

 

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Jar #8

 

Another jar in the works… This one designed the same as a coffee mug that I painted for my cousin. The quote above the picture is from one of my top 5 favourite authors, Dean Koontz. I included the quote in the words that I chose for this jar. Work in progress – more pictures and details to come.

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A BRIEF INTRODUCTION TO DR. MASARU EMOTO

This also functions as a sneak peak at some of the topics in my upcoming in-depth blog post, “For the Love of Water.”

The following pictures are quotes from Dr. Masaru Emoto. Please find out as much as you can about his work, for the sake of your own health and well-being and that of every other being on Earth.

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